ValueNotes Connect

Welcome to the September issue of ValueNotes Connect.

First there was Siri, and then came Alexa. The other day, a colleague was introduced to Amy Ingram. No, Amy wasn’t a person either; she was an artificial intelligence personal assistant whose sole job was to schedule meetings for the client. Much has been (and continues to be) written about how technology has transformed the way we go about our daily lives. It is increasingly being used in many business cases – transportation, manufacturing, customer service, cyber security, healthcare… and perhaps even journalism.

But can technology really threaten the way we gather and analyse information about our customers, competitors, markets and distribution channels?

Yes – there are tools (technology) that grant us the ability to search for, and aggregate information. But they aren’t intelligent enough (yet) to distil and analyse the data to ensure that the senior management get reports customised to their needs with just the essential insights. That requires a human being. Businesses could hire an army of people to do this, or they could partner with a virtual research assistant. Here are five reasons why businesses might need a Virtual Research Assistant.

The same holds good for monitoring news that feeds into a competitive intelligence exercise. Actually, competitive intelligence calls for the deductive skills of a Sherlock Holmes who looks at the mundane, easily available information and clues, and puts them all together to see the big picture. The trick is in being able to stand back, look at all the relevant information and listen to what it is saying to you.

Do read a case study about how we helped an international information & intelligence provider track competitor, customer and financial news across more than 20 industry sectors on a daily basis.

As always, we hope you enjoy reading our newsletter, and we look forward to your comments.

Best regards.

Five reasons why I need a Virtual Research Assistant

by Kajli Bakhshi

Like most businesses, I face peaks and troughs in my work-cycle. In addition, there are core and non-core responsibilities which I try to balance with the ups and downs of work pressure. So one day I decided to put in a formal request to my supervisor for a virtual research assistant. To support my request I clearly outlined how a research assistant can help manage non-core yet necessary work.

more>>

News monitoring for competitive intelligence

by Varsha Chitale

One of the key misconceptions about competitive intelligence is that it involves spying and other clandestine operations like going through a competitor’s garbage. Actually, competitive intelligence calls for the deductive skills of a Sherlock Holmes. He looks at the mundane, easily available information and clues and puts them all together to see the big picture. The trick is in being able to stand back, look at all the relevant information and listen to what it is saying to you.

more>>

Insights

  • Case study: Research support helps information provider deliver high quality service

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Some client problems we have solved:

  • News monitoring for a leading American greeting cards and gifts company
  • Market monitoring and industry updates on the healthcare sector
  • Custom newsletter for an Asia-Pacific fund manager’s infrastructure clients
  • Competitive Intelligence on the global marine P&C insurance segment
  • Business intelligence on mining & construction equipment manufacturers

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Do get in touch with us on email – research@valuenotes.co.in
Or leave us a message using our online form
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